Right Now in BrainStuff

In the United Kingdom in the 1800s, anatomists wanted to study real bodies, but laws and cultural stigma made bodies hard to come by. Learn how the shocking Burke & Hare murder trials changed that in this episode of BrainStuff.

BrainStuff Classics: How Does Déjà vu Work?

If you've ver gotten the strange feeling that you’re repeating an experience, researchers have about 40 theories for what was going on in your brain. Learn how déjà vu might work in this episode of BrainStuff.

How Do Animals Survive Big Storms?

Sadly, not all animals make it through major storms like hurricanes, but some have impressive survival skills. Learn how they manage in this episode of BrainStuff.

How Often Have Supreme Court Nominees Been Rejected?

Many presidents' nominations of justices to the Supreme Court go through uncontested, but some have gotten seriously sticky. Learn the history of Supreme Court nominations in this episode of BrainStuff.

Is Physics as We Know It About to Change?

Newly researched cosmic rays seem to behave differently than the laws of physics say they should. Learn how this could help us fill in some blanks about our universe in this episode of BrainStuff.

Why Can't You Reach the End of a Rainbow?

Rainbows may look like they touch the ground somewhere off in the distance, but it's impossible to find that spot. Learn why in this episode of BrainStuff.

Is Coconut Oil a 'Superfood' or 'Pure Poison'?

Recent guidelines from the American Heart Association warn that coconut oil is not a healthy food, despite popular claims that it's a miracle worker. Learn why in this episode of BrainStuff.

BrainStuff Classics: Why Do Men Have Deeper Voices?

Of course, everybody's voice varies, but in general male humans develop lower-pitched voices than female humans starting around puberty. Learn why in this classic episode of BrainStuff. 

How Can Sunlight Make You Sneeze?

Sudden exposure to bright light makes some people sneeze -- but why? Learn the leading theory in this episode of BrainStuff.

What Was the First Computer?

The first machine for computation was designed in the 1800s! Learn how its creators, Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace, set about inventing it in this episode of BrainStuff. 

Why Is Blackface So Controversial?

It may seem like folks make too big of a deal over blackface, but its history puts that outrage into perspective. Learn why in this episode of BrainStuff.

How Do Our Bones Grow?

We humans are fairly squishy, and we eat fairly squishy food. So how do we grow hard bones? Learn how it happens in this episode of BrainStuff.

What's the History of Southern Biscuits?

Fluffy biscuits are a cornerstone of Southern cuisine, but they're a relatively recent invention. Learn the history behind this baked good in today's episode of BrainStuff. 

Could a Giant Squid Take Down a Submarine?

Tales of squid attacking ships go way back, and there are some known instances of squid attacking subs, but could a cephalopod really take down a modern vessel? Learn what researchers think in this episode of BrainStuff.

Why Are Ice Pops Called Quiescently Frozen Confections?

You won't find the word 'popsicle' on the packaging for some ice pops -- instead, they're called 'quiescently frozen confections'. Learn why this sciencey term is used instead of the more simple one in today's episode of BrainStuff.

What Happens to Balloons When You Release Them?

How high can helium balloons go before they burst? Do they always burst? Learn about the physics of escaped balloons in this episode of BrainStuff. 

What's the Difference Between Weather and Climate?

When concepts are as intertwined as weather and climate, it can be easy to mix them up. Learn the difference, and why it matters so much in discussions about the environment, in this episode of BrainStuff.

Was George Washington Almost King of the United States?

Did the generals of the Revolutionary War really try to hand George Washington a monarchy? Learn the truth behind this slightly tall tale in today's episode of BrainStuff.

What Is Nuclear Pasta?

No, it's not radioactive noodles -- nuclear pasta is the term for weird material produced in neutron stars. Learn why astrophysicists are so interested in how it works in this episode of BrainStuff. 

What Would Happen If You Wrecked a Car on a Test-Drive?

If you wreck a car during a test-drive, would you have to pay for it? Learn how car dealers handle this surprisingly rare occurance in today's episode of BrainStuff.